Lake Macquarie History

Mirrabooka

Name Origin:

Aboriginal for Southern Cross, or possibly, "dog died here".

Early Land Grants:

Portion 330 and 399 (Morisset Parish): James Stinson.

Early Subdivisions:

D.P.15556, "Plan of Mirrabooka Estate" declared on 5 December 1927: this subdivision, which is bounded by Lake Macquarie, includes Porowi Road, Mooranga Road, Fishery Point Road, Hillcrest Road, and Mirrabooka Road. The vendor is believed to have been one of the Stinson family. Near the end of Maipoona Road on the western side is a small weatherboard building which was the estate office.

Early Settlers:

The Stinson family lived on the north side of Sugar Bay. Hansons owned 65 acres in the Hillcrest Road area but the Hanson house was at Sunshine Extended on the other side of the hill.

Early Industries:

Marshall's sugar plantation was at Brightwaters across the bay 1865-75. Timber cutting was the main industry on the Morisset Peninsula for many years, the wood being taken either to the sawmills at Morisset or by water to other lakeside towns. Fishing and subsistence farming were also undertaken. Lake Macquarie City Council operates a gravel quarry there.

Early Transport:

By water or by horse and dray to Morisset.

First Post Office:

Mirraview post office opened 27 July 1936 and closed 30 November 1971.

First School:

Mirraview provisional school opened July 1934. It operated as a public school from April 1936 to May 1972.

Town:

Between 1934 and 1970 a village showed signs of developing on top of the hill near the shop on Fishery Point Road. Bureaucracy smiled on Mirraview and supplied a Post Office, school, branch library and a tar-sealed road. Even with this encouragement it failed to thrive. The name fell into disuse, Post Office, school and library closed. Today there are signs of a resurgence under the name Mirrabooka. The name Mirraview apparently taken from an old subdivision on Silverwater Road.

Water Supply:

1963.

Streets in Mirrabooka